Guitar Power Chords

The Basics And How-to’s of Guitar Power Chords

Every song, melody, riff, and beat is determined by an important element of music – chords. Chords carry the totality of all composition pieces you’ll ever hear; from country to rock, from ballad to heavy metal.

Chords are composed of notes that are played simultaneously. It varies from their interval, octave, and progression. It is also divided into two different flavors: the minor and the major.

Right now, we’ll focus on one important interval that is commonly used and preferred by those who interest rock and blues music.

These are the guitar power chords.
Guitar power chords chart
The low and deep sound we often hear from a rock song is a product of power chords. The notes on either a barre or open chords hold these guitar power chords.

Power chords are composed of different notes, usually two separate notes. These notes are constantly apart by five steps.

Playing power chords only includes two strings. Placing the number five with the root note is the identifying method used to label a power chords. For instance, an E power chord may be represented as an E5, a C power chord may be represented as C5.

Some rock songs use power chords than the usual full chord to give emphasis on the vocal portion of the song. It enables the vocals to be more prominent and evident.

Distortion is used by heavy metal / heavy rock guitarist to generate a pretentious and heavy sound. The use of distortion doesn’t match when used with full chords, requiring guitarist to stick with power chords for this technique.

Some say that power chords are considered more as a “Dyad” than a chord.

A fascinating feature of guitar power chords is it does not use a third note. Meaning, it does not have a quality that generates the major or minor flavors which is connected to barre chords.

The Difference Between Guitar Power Chords and Barre Chords

A barre chord is basically a bar through the fretboard. It often utilizes the index finger where it is pressed against the six strings together. It is known for its more harmonic quality tone.

Barre chords are made up of combinations that are more vibrant and dynamic.

On the other hand, a power chord is a considered to be a portion of a barre chord. It is easier and simpler to play. It also sounds rawer and thicker.

Also, there can only be a maximum of two chords in a power chord.

Getting to know the correct position of a common power chord will allow you to create music. The positioning of your finger while plotting the chords are often the same.

You will be the one to determine whether you’ll prefer to use two or three fingers while playing the chord. With two fingers, you’ll be able to shift the position of your power chord quicker and with ease. Once comfortable enough, you’ll then learn to use three fingers, and then you’ll notice that the music will sound fuller.

Varieties of Guitar Power Chords:

First, Movable. These are the lowest movable three or two notes of the barre chords. It can be A-based or E-based.

Second, Open-Position. These are often times the simple lowest three or two notes of the open-position. Some of the famous power chords classified as open-position chords are D5, E5, and A5.

Since it has the movable capability, power chords can be played on all the frets, but it mostly lands on the 5th and 6th strings. Once you’ve learned your fretboard, you’ll be able to easily figure out the notes that you want to play.

How to Play the Chords?

A5 Power Chord


 

To play this chord, you will start with the low E string or the root note found on the 6th string. For this, the first step is to place your one finger on the 5th fret, this is found on the 5th fret same with the E sting. Afterwards on the A string’s 7th fret, place another finger.

You will be able to play the A chord once your simultaneously strum both these notes. If you prefer to include an extra A note, considered to be higher by an octave to the lowest root – Just place your another finger on the 7th fret for the D string.

If you prefer to start on the 5th string to play the A power chord, then on D string’s 2nd fret, place one finger. You can play this along with the A string that is open. The A note know to have a higher octave located on the G string’s second fret can be included.

B5 Power Chord


Second Chord is the B power chord. As always, to start this you must begin with the 6th string’s root note. On the E string’s 7th fret, place one finger. Next, on the A string’s 9th fret, place another finger. If you prefer to include another B note, considered to be higher by an octave to the lowest root, operate another finger to play the D string’s 9th fret.

If you prefer to start on the 5th string to play the B power chord, On the A string’s 2nd fret, place your first finger. On the D string’s 4th fret, place another finger. Also, to take in another B note, push down on the G string’s 4th fret with another finger.

C5 Power Chord

Third Chord is the C power chord. On the E string’s 8th fret, place one finger. Next, on the A string’s 10th fret, place another finger. If you prefer to include another C note, considered to be higher by an octave to the lowest root, operate another finger to play the D string’s 10th fret.

If you prefer to start on the 5th string to play the C power chord, On the A string’s 3rd fret, place your first finger. On the D string’s 5thth fret, place another finger. Also, to take in another C note, push down on the G string’s 5th fret with another finger.

D5 Power Chord

Fourth Chord is the D power chord. On the E string’s 10th fret, place one finger. Next, on the A string’s 12th fret, place another finger. If you prefer to include another D note, considered to be higher by an octave to the lowest root, operate another finger to play the D string’s 12th fret.

If you prefer to start on the 5th string to play the D power chord, On the A string’s 5th fret, place your first finger. On the D string’s 7thth fret, place another finger. Also, to take in another D note, push down on the G string’s 7th fret with another finger.

E5 Power Chord

Fifth Chord is the E power chord. On the E string’s 2nd fret, place one finger. If you prefer to include another D note, considered to be higher by an octave to the lowest root, operate another finger to play the D string’s 2nd fret.

If you prefer to start on the 5th string to play the E power chord, On the A string’s 7th fret, place your first finger. On the D string’s 9thth fret, place another finger. Also, to take in another E note, push down on the G string’s 9th fret with another finger.

F5 Power Chord

Sixth Chord is the F power chord. On the E string’s 1st fret, place one finger. If you prefer to include another F note, considered to be higher by an octave to the lowest root, operate another finger to play the D string’s 3rd fret.

If you prefer to start on the 5th string to play the F power chord, On the A string’s 8th fret, place your first finger. On the D string’s 10thth fret, place another finger. Also, to take in another D note, push down on the G string’s 10th fret with another finger.

G5 Power Chord

Sixth Chord is the G power chord. On the E string’s 3rd fret, place one finger. If you prefer to include another G note, considered to be higher by an octave to the lowest root, operate another finger to play the D string’s 5th fret.

If you prefer to start on the 5th string to play the G power chord, On the A string’s 10th fret, place your first finger. On the D string’s 12thth fret, place another finger. Also, to take in another D note, push down on the G string’s 12th fret with another finger.

Remember the following tips in using guitar power chords while you play; the string that you should strum are those that you are fretting; the distance from the root note and your 4th and 3rd finger should be two frets apart; and your variations should be mixed up so you can add more details. Now that you’ve learned some steps about Power Chords, you’re ready to practice and improve your skills.